The Art & Soul of Mexico

"Oaxaca today is just the sort of colonial Mexican city that elicits a barrage of tourist-idyll clichés from guidebooks and brochures, descriptions that usually include the words charming, enchanting, and pristine.
It’s not hard to see why: there’s the 17th-century architecture—churches, government buildings, and plazas—much of it constructed using the region’s signature green stone. Behind adobe walls with leafy courtyards, restaurants serve some of the country’s best cuisine... A growing collection of contemporary art galleries and rural crafts markets testifies to Oaxaca’s vibrant culture, while the surrounding indigenous villages and Mesoamerican archaeological sites reflect its deep history." (Travel & Leisure)

Hotel Los Golondrinas

Your charming one-story hotel sits amid rambling patios with roses, Fuchsia, bougainvillea, and mature banana trees. The simply furnished rooms, with windows and doors opening onto courtyards, all have tile floors and a small desk and chairs. Each holds either one full or two twin beds. Breakfast is served between 8 and 10am in a small tile-covered cafe in a garden setting. ILos Golondrinas is 6 1/2 blocks north of the zócalo and just a short walk to Humberto's studio.

After Class....

“The late afternoon is golden.....wherever I turn, there's something delightful: a marimba band playing, teenage girls strolling arm in arm, a rainbow of woven vinyl baskets, a vendor surrounded by a mountain of balloons, a woman selling bouquets of heady gardenias for pennies. The city seems almost surreal - a reminder, in case I needed one, that no matter how peaceful your hotel room may be, in Mexico there's always something intriguing, something serendipitous.... going on outside."
(Travel & Leisure)

Oaxacan Cuisine

"For decades, the lovely colonial city of Oaxaca, surrounded by magnificent Zapotec and Mixtec archaeological sites, has been my favorite destination in Mexico. Above all, I am drawn by the finest regional cooking in the country... Oaxaca is famous as the "land of seven moles" - the complex chili sauce sometimes incorporating chocolate, nuts or toasted seeds and spices that change the flavors and the colors from amarillo (yellow) to negro (black) - and I love them. But there is so much more to the region's food..." (New York Times)